Thunderbirds and foretold battles

Doing research on a history that is not your own can become confusing but remarkably interesting. A resource I love to read is Dr. Lisa Christiansen. Her father, from the Wolf Clan of the eastern band of the United Keetoowah Band of the Cherokee, was documented as one...

Community Hunting

Cherokees hunted to feed themselves and their communities using various weapons. Hunting required fasting, ceremony and medicine specific to the undertaking.  Cherokee men hunted mainly for sustenance and different game required different tools. Bows and arrows...

Native Winter Shelter and activities

With winter creeping into our everyday lives again and the bitter cold nights appearing I wonder what those that came before us on this beautiful mountain did to stay warm. Clothing prior to European arrival was dependent on the materials available and climate. The...

Blood Mountain Blog

Some believe that the name of the mountain comes from a bloody battle between the Cherokee and Creek Indians.

A Walk Through Buffalo Country in Northern Georgia

Three hundred years ago the Southern Appalachians were home to the sovereign Cherokee Nation. Over sixty towns and settlements were connected by a well-worn system of foot trails, many of which later became bridle paths and wagon roads. This Indian trail system was...

Getting the pantry ready for fall

The beginning of Cherokee culture is identified with the cultivation of corn by the native people in the Southern Appalachians more than a thousand years ago. From the earliest times in Cherokee history, the raising of corn was interwoven with the spiritual beliefs of...

The Bees’ Story

Bees are responsible for the pollination of almost every fruit, nut, and vegetable crop. Bees pollinate 1 of every 3 bites of food we eat. Most bee species are important pollinators of our food crops. Recent estimates suggest that bees contribute $15 Billion in pollination services to the U.S. economy each year.

The Cherokee say back in ancient times when the people were purer and could converse with the animals. The Creator would visit with them. The people asked the Creator for something that was “sweet” to the taste. So, the Creator sent the Bee, but the Bee had no stinger. Down came the Bee and it found a suitable tree in which, they could build their hive, live in, produce honey, multiply and feed its young. Soon the people came to the Bee and asked for some of the sweet syrup and the Bee gave each person a container full.

Living in a U.S.A. Rain Forest

This year mother nature is proving we live in a lush but non tropical rain forest.  What is that you say?  It is true!  We live in the Appalachian temperate rainforest.  The Appalachian Mountains started to form somewhere around 400 million years...

Listing in this environment

My goodness what a year 2020 has started out to be.  In May of this year we began to hear the rumblings of folks wanting to get up to the mountains and I do not blame them one bit.  We have spent the better part of this six months just being grateful for the...